Posts Tagged "Diabetic Foot Care"

Protein discovery may improve treatments for diabetic eye disease

Posted by on Oct 24, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Medical News Today / By Catharine Paddock PhD / 10/24/2017 Recent research has discovered a protein that plays a key role in diabetes-related vision loss, which may lead to better treatments for a major cause of blindness and might also have implications for other diseases, including cancer. In a report published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City describe what they found about the protein, which is known as ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6), and its role in diabetic retinopathy. To continue reading please click here...

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5 habits that foster weight loss

Posted by on Mar 11, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Harvard Heart Letter   / Published: March 1, 2017 If you’re like many Americans, you’re still carrying an extra pound or two that you gained over the holidays. Over the years, that extra weight can really add up—and that added girth is hard on your heart. Often, the hardest part about losing weight isn’t about knowing what to eat. You’ve heard it a thousand times: eat lots of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and lean protein. The real challenge is changing your habits to make those healthy choices part of your everyday routine without feeling too deprived. When you come home Where to start? Try a little respect, says Dr. George L. Blackburn, professor of nutrition at Harvard Medical School. “Show respect for the food you’re eating. Before you sit down to dinner, lay out your meal on a white tablecloth, which will make you more likely to eat mindfully,” he says. Mindfulness—the practice of being fully aware of what’s happening within and around you at the moment—seems to help people make better food choices, in terms of both what and how they eat. It’s also important to respect your hunger, which means you should eat as closely as possible to the time you feel hungry (but not starving). Finally, respect your cravings. “Select foods that taste good to you, because taste is king,” says Dr. Blackburn. You need to stick within healthy parameters, of course, and choose foods that follow the recommendations laid out by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (see www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015). But if you’ve got a hankering for a few French fries or a small brownie once in a while, go ahead. A complete ban of your favorite treats may leave you more likely to abandon your diet altogether and overindulge. Dr. Blackburn has directed the Center for Nutrition Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and advised overweight and obese people for more than four decades. The following are five proven strategies that many of his patients have found helpful toward their goal of lasting weight loss. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Kids’ Exercise Predicts Adult Income

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Finnish study finds links between early physical activity and future earnings, but only for boys. Source:  Runners World / ByAlex Hutchinson TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2016, 9:58 AM The study, by researchers at several universities in Finland and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, looked at data from 3,000 kids whose physical activity levels were assessed in the 1980s when they were 9, 12, and 15 years old. That data was then linked to Finnish tax records to determine their average income over the 10 years ending in 2010. Among men, the results were clear: Boys who were more active by one standard deviation went on to earn about 30 percent more as adults. That relationship remained robust even after controlling for various factors like family background (including parental levels of physical activity) and weight. To view the entire article please click here...

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Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity

Posted by on Feb 14, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Mayo Clinic You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life. By Mayo Clinic Staff Want to feel better, have more energy and even add years to your life? Just exercise. The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore. Everyone benefits from exercise, regardless of age, sex or physical ability. Need more convincing to get moving? Check out these seven ways exercise can lead to a happier, healthier you. Click here to view the entire article...

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VIDEO: Pump iron into your diet without meat

Posted by on Feb 13, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Pump iron into your diet without meat Many of us don’t get enough iron. CNN Senior Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen has simple ways to get more of this essential mineral. Click here to view video >>>> Source:...

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A stronger heart may keep your brain young

Posted by on Feb 13, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

POSTED FEBRUARY 24, 2016, 9:00 AM Source:  Julie Corliss, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter You probably know that regular exercise offers a wealth of benefits for your body, like staving off excess weight and chronic illnesses like heart disease and diabetes. But mounting evidence suggests that exercise is also good for your brain. A study published in the journal Neurology links better cardiovascular fitness to improved thinking skills in older adults. The findings add to our understanding of how exercise benefits the brain, which seems to stem from several possible mechanisms, says Dr. John Ratey, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain. “It’s not just about delivering more oxygen to the brain, although that’s part of it,” he says. Having a fit, healthy cardiovascular system also protects against vascular dementia, which happens when blood vessels feeding the brain become blocked or narrowed, leading to memory and other cognitive problems. To view the entire article please click here...

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WSJ: Steps to Better Foot Health

Posted by on May 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Wall Street Journal “Steps to Better Foot Health” 09/16/2013 Doctors say people often ignore persistent but minor foot complaints, which can later develop into bigger problems, like lower back pain. Some common foot problems can mask underlying issues that are correctable if addressed early. Tender feet might be a sign of a pinched nerve, for example, or bunions might stem from weak arches. Other foot ailments, such as sores that don’t heal, can point to a more serious condition, such as diabetes. Podiatrists say foot ailments are a growing problem as more people get physically active. Running marathons, for instance, puts added pressure on the feet and can worsen existing issues that might be caused by genetics or poor footwear choices. Feet also must bear the burden from the growing numbers of people who are overweight or obese. Many people don’t wear shoes with proper support, which is especially harmful for active athletes, says Leslie Campbell, a spokeswoman for the American Podiatric Medical Association, a professional organization. “We see more young children coming in because they play sports like soccer and wear cleats, which are rigid, don’t absorb shock, cause fatigue and should be worn as little as possible,” she says. Dr. Campbell, a podiatrist at Presbyterian Hospital in Allen, Texas, recommends soccer players not wear cleats off the field and be sure to warm up adequately before playing so the joints are supple in the shoe. To read the entire article, please click here...

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Do you have arch pain?

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Definition The term arch pain (often referred to as arch strain) refers to an inflammation and/or burning sensation at the arch of the foot. Cause There are many different factors that can cause arch pain. A structural imbalance or an injury to the foot can often be the direct cause. However, most frequently the cause is a common condition called plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a broad band of fibrous tissue located along the bottom surface of the foot that runs from the heel to the forefoot. Excessive stretching of the plantar fascia, usually due to over-pronation (flat feet), causes plantar fasciitis. The inflammation caused by the plantar fascia being stretched away from the heel often leads to pain in the heel and arch areas. The pain is often extreme in the morning when an individual first gets out of bed or after a prolonged period of rest. If this condition is left untreated and strain on the longitudinal arch continues, a bony protrusion may develop, known as a heel spur. It is important to treat the condition promptly before it worsens. Treatment and Prevention This is a common foot condition that can be easily treated. If you suffer from arch pain avoid high-heeled shoes whenever possible. Try to choose footwear with a reasonable heel, soft leather uppers, shock absorbing soles and removable foot insoles. When the arch pain is pronation related (flat feet), an orthotic designed with a medial heel post and proper arch support is recommended for treating the pain. This type of orthotic will control over-pronation, support the arch and provide the necessary relief. If the problem persists, consult your foot doctor. . Source:  www.foot.com “Do you have arch pain?”       727 East Jefferson Blvd.   South Bend, IN 46614  ...

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Even Slightly Higher BP May Raise Stroke Risk

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

High blood pressure has long been pegged as a risk factor for stroke, but a new analysis suggests that even slightly elevated blood pressure levels raise the odds of suffering a stroke. The sweeping review analyzed data from 760,000 study participants who were followed for up to 36 years. The researchers found that people with “prehypertension” — higher-than-optimal blood pressure not officially defined as high blood pressure — were 66 percent more likely to experience a stroke than those with normal blood pressure. “This meta-analysis confirms evidence from many studies, and I think it continues to warn physicians and the public that more vigorous control of blood pressure is important for reducing stroke risk,” said Dr. Ralph Sacco, chairman of neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, who was not involved in the research. “The findings confirm that even mild to moderate levels of elevated blood pressure are important for determining stroke risk.” Source:  www.webmd.com “Even Slightly Higher BP May Raise Stroke Risk” March 12, 2014   727 East Jefferson Blvd. South Bend, IN 46614...

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‘Master regulator’ of obesity?

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Mutations within the gene FTO have been implicated as the strongest genetic determinant of obesity risk in humans, but the mechanism behind this link remained unknown. Now, an international team of scientists has discovered that the obesity-associated elements within FTO interact with IRX3, a distant gene on the genome that appears to be the functional obesity gene. The FTO gene itself appears to have only a peripheral effect on obesity. tations within the gene FTO have been implicated as the strongest genetic determinant of obesity risk in humans, but the mechanism behind this link remained unknown. Now, an international team of scientists has discovered that the obesity-associated elements within FTO interact with IRX3, a distant gene on the genome that appears to be the functional obesity gene. The FTO gene itself appears to have only a peripheral effect on obesity. The study appears online March 12 in Nature. “Our data strongly suggest that IRX3 controls body mass and regulates body composition,” said senior study author Marcelo Nobrega, PhD, associate professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago. “Any association between FTO and obesity appears due to the influence of IRX3.” Mutations to introns (noncoding portions) of the gene FTO have been widely investigated after genome-wide association studies revealed a strong link between FTO and obesity and diabetes. Yet overexpressing or deleting FTO in animal models affects whole body mass and composition, not just fat, and experiments have failed to show that these obesity-linked introns affect the function of the FTO gene itself. Hoping to explain these observations, Nobrega and his team mapped the behavior of promoters — regions of DNA that activate gene expression — located within one million base pairs on either side of the FTO gene. In adult mice brains, where FTO was thought to affect metabolic function, they discovered that the promoter that turns on FTO did not interact with obesity-associated FTO introns. “Instead, we found that the promoter for IRX3, a gene several hundred thousand base pairs away, did interact with these introns, as well as a large number of other elements across the vast genetic distance we studied,” said co-author Jose Luis Gomez-Skarmeta, PhD, a geneticist at the Andalusian Center of Developmental Biology in Sevilla, Spain. The researchers found a similar pattern of interactions in humans after analyzing data from the ENCODE project, which they confirmed with experiments on human cells. Using data from 153 brain samples from individuals of European ancestry, they discovered that the mutations to FTO introns that affected body weight are associated with IRX3 expression, but not FTO. Obesity-related FTO introns enhanced the expression of IRX3, functioning as regulatory elements. The FTO gene itself did not appear to play a role in this interaction. “Regulatory elements are switches that turn genes on and off. What we’ve found is that the switches that control IRX3 are far away from the gene and actually inside the FTO gene,” says Nobrega. Source :  http://www.sciencedaily.com “Master regulator’ of obesity? Distant IRX3 gene appears to interact with obesity-related FTO gene mutations”    March 12, 2014 727 East Jefferson Blvd. South Bend, IN 46614 574-287-5859...

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