Posts Tagged "Foot and Ankle Specialist"

Do you have arch pain?

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Definition The term arch pain (often referred to as arch strain) refers to an inflammation and/or burning sensation at the arch of the foot. Cause There are many different factors that can cause arch pain. A structural imbalance or an injury to the foot can often be the direct cause. However, most frequently the cause is a common condition called plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a broad band of fibrous tissue located along the bottom surface of the foot that runs from the heel to the forefoot. Excessive stretching of the plantar fascia, usually due to over-pronation (flat feet), causes plantar fasciitis. The inflammation caused by the plantar fascia being stretched away from the heel often leads to pain in the heel and arch areas. The pain is often extreme in the morning when an individual first gets out of bed or after a prolonged period of rest. If this condition is left untreated and strain on the longitudinal arch continues, a bony protrusion may develop, known as a heel spur. It is important to treat the condition promptly before it worsens. Treatment and Prevention This is a common foot condition that can be easily treated. If you suffer from arch pain avoid high-heeled shoes whenever possible. Try to choose footwear with a reasonable heel, soft leather uppers, shock absorbing soles and removable foot insoles. When the arch pain is pronation related (flat feet), an orthotic designed with a medial heel post and proper arch support is recommended for treating the pain. This type of orthotic will control over-pronation, support the arch and provide the necessary relief. If the problem persists, consult your foot doctor. . Source:  www.foot.com “Do you have arch pain?”       727 East Jefferson Blvd.   South Bend, IN 46614  ...

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Morton’s Neuroma: Treatment options for foot pain

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Did you know you have 26 bones, 33 joints and more than 100 muscles in your foot? With such a complex structure, it’s no wonder foot pain is so common. We recently got this question from a viewer in Texas: Hello Dr. Manny, I’ve just been diagnosed with Morton’s Neuroma in my left foot, and it’s very painful. What are my treatment options? Thanks, Donna Morton’s Neuroma is caused by a thickening of the tissue around one of the nerves that leads out to your toes. It usually happens between the third and fourth toes, and can sometimes feel like a pebble stuck in your sock. Risk factors for the condition include: Having foot abnormalities like bunions, hammertoes or arch problems Wearing high heels, which can put extra pressure on your toes Participating in high-impact sports like running, which can cause repetitive trauma to your feet Treatment options for Morton’s Neuroma depend on the severity of your symptoms, but here are some options your doctor may suggest: Wearing shoes with wider toe boxes Using over-the-counter arch supports and foot pads Physical therapy A prescription for custom-made orthotics Anti-inflammatory medications taken orally or injected into the area Nerve-blocking injections Decompression surgery that relieves pressure by cutting nearby strictures Surgery to remove the nerve causing pain Talk to your doctor to decide on the best treatment option for you. Do you have a health question for Dr. Manny? Please send it to DrManny@foxnews.com Source:  www.foxnews.com “Morton’s Neuroma: Treatment options for foot pain” January 26, 2014     727 East Jefferson Blvd. South Bend, IN 46614...

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‘Master regulator’ of obesity?

Posted by on Mar 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Mutations within the gene FTO have been implicated as the strongest genetic determinant of obesity risk in humans, but the mechanism behind this link remained unknown. Now, an international team of scientists has discovered that the obesity-associated elements within FTO interact with IRX3, a distant gene on the genome that appears to be the functional obesity gene. The FTO gene itself appears to have only a peripheral effect on obesity. tations within the gene FTO have been implicated as the strongest genetic determinant of obesity risk in humans, but the mechanism behind this link remained unknown. Now, an international team of scientists has discovered that the obesity-associated elements within FTO interact with IRX3, a distant gene on the genome that appears to be the functional obesity gene. The FTO gene itself appears to have only a peripheral effect on obesity. The study appears online March 12 in Nature. “Our data strongly suggest that IRX3 controls body mass and regulates body composition,” said senior study author Marcelo Nobrega, PhD, associate professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago. “Any association between FTO and obesity appears due to the influence of IRX3.” Mutations to introns (noncoding portions) of the gene FTO have been widely investigated after genome-wide association studies revealed a strong link between FTO and obesity and diabetes. Yet overexpressing or deleting FTO in animal models affects whole body mass and composition, not just fat, and experiments have failed to show that these obesity-linked introns affect the function of the FTO gene itself. Hoping to explain these observations, Nobrega and his team mapped the behavior of promoters — regions of DNA that activate gene expression — located within one million base pairs on either side of the FTO gene. In adult mice brains, where FTO was thought to affect metabolic function, they discovered that the promoter that turns on FTO did not interact with obesity-associated FTO introns. “Instead, we found that the promoter for IRX3, a gene several hundred thousand base pairs away, did interact with these introns, as well as a large number of other elements across the vast genetic distance we studied,” said co-author Jose Luis Gomez-Skarmeta, PhD, a geneticist at the Andalusian Center of Developmental Biology in Sevilla, Spain. The researchers found a similar pattern of interactions in humans after analyzing data from the ENCODE project, which they confirmed with experiments on human cells. Using data from 153 brain samples from individuals of European ancestry, they discovered that the mutations to FTO introns that affected body weight are associated with IRX3 expression, but not FTO. Obesity-related FTO introns enhanced the expression of IRX3, functioning as regulatory elements. The FTO gene itself did not appear to play a role in this interaction. “Regulatory elements are switches that turn genes on and off. What we’ve found is that the switches that control IRX3 are far away from the gene and actually inside the FTO gene,” says Nobrega. Source :  http://www.sciencedaily.com “Master regulator’ of obesity? Distant IRX3 gene appears to interact with obesity-related FTO gene mutations”    March 12, 2014 727 East Jefferson Blvd. South Bend, IN 46614 574-287-5859...

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Diabetes and Diabetes Symptoms | Family Foot Care Clinic | South Bend IN

Posted by on Mar 17, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is the inability to manufacture or properly use insulin, and it impairs the body’s ability to convert sugars, starches, and other foods into energy. The long-term effects of elevated blood sugar (hyperglycemia) can lead to serious damage to the eyes, heart, kidney, nerves, and feet. Diabetes affects the lives of nearly 26 million people in the United States and nearly seven million don’t even know they have the disease yet. While there is no cure for diabetes, there is hope. With proper diet, exercise, medical care, and careful management at home, a person with diabetes can avoid the most serious complications and enjoy a full and active life. Today’s podiatrist plays a key role in helping patients manage diabetes successfully and avoid foot-related complications. Symptoms Diabetes warning signs include the following: Skin color changes Swelling of the foot or ankle Numbness in the feet or toes Pain in the legs Open sores on the feet that are slow to heal Ingrown and fungal toenails Bleeding corns and calluses Dry cracks in the skin, especially around the heel To view the entire article, please click here >>>> Source:  American Podiatric Medical Association “http://www.apma.org”      ...

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