Posts Tagged "Mishawaka podiatrist"

Protein discovery may improve treatments for diabetic eye disease

Posted by on Oct 24, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Medical News Today / By Catharine Paddock PhD / 10/24/2017 Recent research has discovered a protein that plays a key role in diabetes-related vision loss, which may lead to better treatments for a major cause of blindness and might also have implications for other diseases, including cancer. In a report published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City describe what they found about the protein, which is known as ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6), and its role in diabetic retinopathy. To continue reading please click here...

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5 Crazy New Ways to Lose Weight

Posted by on Mar 22, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

BY ERIC SPITZNAGEL FOR MEN’S HEALTH  March 22, 2017 Do high-tech methods like ’CoolSculpting,’ and ‘stomach draining’ actually work? We’ve been chasing weight-loss shortcuts for centuries. From William the Conqueror, who tried a liquid diet after he became too heavy to ride his horse, to Lord Byron, who exercised in layers to sweat off pounds, people have always been drawn to radical slimdown schemes. “They provide a sense of both risk and control,” says Sander Gilman, Ph.D., the author of Fat Boys and Obesity. Do any lose-weight-quick tricks actually do the trick? Sometimes. Here are five crazy things some people are trying. To continue reading please click here...

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5 habits that foster weight loss

Posted by on Mar 11, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Harvard Heart Letter   / Published: March 1, 2017 If you’re like many Americans, you’re still carrying an extra pound or two that you gained over the holidays. Over the years, that extra weight can really add up—and that added girth is hard on your heart. Often, the hardest part about losing weight isn’t about knowing what to eat. You’ve heard it a thousand times: eat lots of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and lean protein. The real challenge is changing your habits to make those healthy choices part of your everyday routine without feeling too deprived. When you come home Where to start? Try a little respect, says Dr. George L. Blackburn, professor of nutrition at Harvard Medical School. “Show respect for the food you’re eating. Before you sit down to dinner, lay out your meal on a white tablecloth, which will make you more likely to eat mindfully,” he says. Mindfulness—the practice of being fully aware of what’s happening within and around you at the moment—seems to help people make better food choices, in terms of both what and how they eat. It’s also important to respect your hunger, which means you should eat as closely as possible to the time you feel hungry (but not starving). Finally, respect your cravings. “Select foods that taste good to you, because taste is king,” says Dr. Blackburn. You need to stick within healthy parameters, of course, and choose foods that follow the recommendations laid out by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (see www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015). But if you’ve got a hankering for a few French fries or a small brownie once in a while, go ahead. A complete ban of your favorite treats may leave you more likely to abandon your diet altogether and overindulge. Dr. Blackburn has directed the Center for Nutrition Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and advised overweight and obese people for more than four decades. The following are five proven strategies that many of his patients have found helpful toward their goal of lasting weight loss. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Bacon, soda & too few nuts tied to big portion of US deaths

Posted by on Mar 7, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:   Lindsey Tanner, AP Medical Writer,Associated Press CHICAGO (AP) — Gorging on bacon, skimping on nuts? These are among food habits that new research links with deaths from heart disease, strokes and diabetes. Overeating or not eating enough of the 10 foods and nutrients contributes to nearly half of U.S. deaths from these causes, the study suggests. “Good” foods that were under-eaten include: nuts and seeds, seafood rich in omega-3 fats including salmon and sardines; fruits and vegetables; and whole grains. “Bad” foods or nutrients that were over-eaten include salt and salty foods; processed meats including bacon, bologna and hot dogs; red meat including steaks and hamburgers; and sugary drinks. The research is based on U.S. government data showing there were about 700,000 deaths in 2012 from heart disease, strokes and diabetes and on an analysis of national health surveys that asked participants about their eating habits. Most didn’t eat the recommended amounts of the foods studied. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Kids’ Exercise Predicts Adult Income

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Finnish study finds links between early physical activity and future earnings, but only for boys. Source:  Runners World / ByAlex Hutchinson TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2016, 9:58 AM The study, by researchers at several universities in Finland and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, looked at data from 3,000 kids whose physical activity levels were assessed in the 1980s when they were 9, 12, and 15 years old. That data was then linked to Finnish tax records to determine their average income over the 10 years ending in 2010. Among men, the results were clear: Boys who were more active by one standard deviation went on to earn about 30 percent more as adults. That relationship remained robust even after controlling for various factors like family background (including parental levels of physical activity) and weight. To view the entire article please click here...

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Learn how to reduce salt with these 5 tips

Posted by on Feb 15, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source: By Julie Corliss, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter A lower sodium diet is healthier for your heart . If you’re like most people, chances are you eat far more than the recommended amount of sodium, one of the main components of salt. Current federal guidelines advise getting no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium daily, but the average American consumes about 3,500 mg a day. Strong evidence from more than 100 clinical trials shows that a lower sodium diet can decrease blood pressure. High blood pressure, which affects one in three American adults, is a key culprit in heart disease. Most of the sodium we eat—about 75%—comes from processed and restaurant foods, not the salt shaker. Learning how to reduce salt in your diet takes some effort, but these five strategies can help. Click here to view the entire article >>>...

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Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity

Posted by on Feb 14, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Mayo Clinic You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life. By Mayo Clinic Staff Want to feel better, have more energy and even add years to your life? Just exercise. The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore. Everyone benefits from exercise, regardless of age, sex or physical ability. Need more convincing to get moving? Check out these seven ways exercise can lead to a happier, healthier you. Click here to view the entire article...

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A stronger heart may keep your brain young

Posted by on Feb 13, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

POSTED FEBRUARY 24, 2016, 9:00 AM Source:  Julie Corliss, Executive Editor, Harvard Heart Letter You probably know that regular exercise offers a wealth of benefits for your body, like staving off excess weight and chronic illnesses like heart disease and diabetes. But mounting evidence suggests that exercise is also good for your brain. A study published in the journal Neurology links better cardiovascular fitness to improved thinking skills in older adults. The findings add to our understanding of how exercise benefits the brain, which seems to stem from several possible mechanisms, says Dr. John Ratey, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain. “It’s not just about delivering more oxygen to the brain, although that’s part of it,” he says. Having a fit, healthy cardiovascular system also protects against vascular dementia, which happens when blood vessels feeding the brain become blocked or narrowed, leading to memory and other cognitive problems. To view the entire article please click here...

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