Posts Tagged "South Bend Podiatrist"

9 MICRO WORKOUTS YOU SHOULD DO EVERY DAY

Posted by on Jun 2, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  https://life.spartan.com/post/9-micro-workouts-you-should-do-every-day Of all the excuses I hear about missing a workout, the lamest by far is “I was too busy.” Too busy to keep yourself healthy? Extend your life? Ensure you’re around to walk your daughter down the aisle or toss your grandson into the air? Here’s a simple solution for you: Spend a half-hour at lunch and five minutes every hour at work doing some sort of physical exercise. Over an eight-hour work day, that’s an hour of activity. You’ll get fit pretty quickly. Exercising in five-minute bursts will keep you alert and motivated. It’s been proven to increase workplace productivity. Here are 10 micro-workouts that I know you can fit into your day. To continue reading please click here...

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Tired of being fatigued

Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Harvard Men’s Health Watch / Published: April, 2017 Weariness, tiredness, lack of energy. There are many ways to describe those times when you are so fatigued you can’t do anything. Often you bounce back after a quick rest or a good night’s sleep, but if fatigue is occurring more often and lasting longer, it could be a sign of something more serious. “Men may chalk up fatigue to aging, but there is no reason you should battle ongoing fatigue,” says Dr. Suzanne Salamon, a geriatric physician with Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “Everyone gets tired sometimes, and your endurance may decline with age — you may not move as fast and sometimes tire quicker — but you should never be too fatigued to enjoy an active lifestyle.” To continue reading this article please click here...

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I tried the science-backed 7-minute fitness routine that’s going viral, and it actually works

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Business Insider /  Erin Brodwin  / Apr 20, 2017, 11:12 AM ET When I first heard about the 7-Minute Workout, an app that promises the benefits of a sweaty bike ride and a trip to the gym in just a few minutes, I thought it was all hype. But as it turns out, the app, well, works you out. I tried it for the first time last year, and I’m still hooked, so I recently got in touch with Chris Jordan, the director of exercise physiology at the Johnson & Johnson Human Performance Institute and the person behind the Johnson & Johnson Official 7 Minute Workout, to get some insight into how it works. For me, the app is perfect for weekends, or when I can’t make it to a yoga class, or as something fun to do with a friend at home. First things first: The entire workout really takes just 7 minutes. Initially, I was skeptical I could accomplish this much in such a narrow time frame. To continue reading this article please click here...

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An Hour of Running May Add 7 Hours to Your Life

Posted by on Apr 13, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  New York Times / By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS / APRIL 12, 2017 Running may be the single most effective exercise to increase life expectancy, according to a new review and analysis of past research about exercise and premature death. The new study found that, compared to nonrunners, runners tended to live about three additional years, even if they run slowly or sporadically and smoke, drink or are overweight. No other form of exercise that researchers looked at showed comparable impacts on life span. The findings come as a follow-up to a study done three years ago, in which a group of distinguished exercise scientists scrutinized data from a large trove of medical and fitness tests conducted at the Cooper Institute in Dallas. That analysis found that as little as five minutes of daily running was associated with prolonged life spans. After that study was released, the researchers were inundated with queries from fellow scientists and the general public, says Duck-chul Lee, a professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University and a co-author of the study. Some people asked if other activities, such as walking, were likely to be as beneficial as running for reducing mortality risks. Click here to continue reading...

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New Spinal Cord Treatment Lets Paralyzed Man Stand for the First Time in Years

Posted by on Apr 6, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  https://futurism.com / by Karla Lant Researchers at the Mayo Clinic successfully used intense physical therapy and electrical stimulation on the spinal cord to help a patient stand, intentionally move his paralyzed legs, and make step-like motions. These were the first movements the patient had experienced in his legs in three years. 26-year-old Jered Chinnock injured his spinal cord at the sixth thoracic vertebrae three years ago. He could not move or feel anything lower than the middle of his back, and was diagnosed with a motor complete spinal cord injury. At the outset of the study, Chinnock underwent 22 weeks of physical therapy with three training sessions per week. His training goal was to prepare his muscles so they would be strong enough to attempt the physical tasks while his spinal cord was being stimulated. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Stretching: The new mobility protection

Posted by on Mar 28, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Harvard Health Letter / Published: November, 2016 A loss of flexibility may not seem like a big deal as we age. After all, it’s no longer necessary to do the kinds of athletic moves we did when we were younger. But flexibility is the secret sauce that enables us to move safely and easily, and the way to stay limber is to stretch. “People don’t always realize how important stretching is to avoiding injury and disability,” says Elissa Huber-Anderson, a physical therapist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Losing flexibility Flexibility declines as the years go by because the muscles get stiffer. And if you don’t stretch them, the muscles will shorten. “A shortened muscle does not contract as well as a muscle at its designed length,” explains Huber-Anderson. Calling on a shortened muscle for activity puts you at risk for muscle damage, strains, and joint pain. Shortened muscles also increase your risk for falling and make it harder to do activities that require flexibility, such as climbing stairs or reaching for a cup in a kitchen cabinet. “Warning signs that it’s becoming a problem would be having difficulty putting on your shoes and socks or tucking in the back of your shirt,” says Huber-Anderson. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Our best balance boosters

Posted by on Mar 22, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Harvard Health Letter  Published: June, 2016 One in three people ages 65 or older will suffer a fall. It’s time to assess your balance and improve it. Many older adults focus on exercise and diet to stay healthy. But one of the worst offenders to health—poor balance—is often an afterthought. “I see a lot of older adults who are nonchalant about balance,” says Liz Moritz, a physical therapist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Unfortunately, imbalance is a common cause of falls, which send millions of people in the United States to emergency departments each year with broken hips and head injuries. But there are many things you can do to improve your balance. The strategies below are some of the most effective. To continue reading this article please click here...

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5 habits that foster weight loss

Posted by on Mar 11, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:  Harvard Heart Letter   / Published: March 1, 2017 If you’re like many Americans, you’re still carrying an extra pound or two that you gained over the holidays. Over the years, that extra weight can really add up—and that added girth is hard on your heart. Often, the hardest part about losing weight isn’t about knowing what to eat. You’ve heard it a thousand times: eat lots of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and lean protein. The real challenge is changing your habits to make those healthy choices part of your everyday routine without feeling too deprived. When you come home Where to start? Try a little respect, says Dr. George L. Blackburn, professor of nutrition at Harvard Medical School. “Show respect for the food you’re eating. Before you sit down to dinner, lay out your meal on a white tablecloth, which will make you more likely to eat mindfully,” he says. Mindfulness—the practice of being fully aware of what’s happening within and around you at the moment—seems to help people make better food choices, in terms of both what and how they eat. It’s also important to respect your hunger, which means you should eat as closely as possible to the time you feel hungry (but not starving). Finally, respect your cravings. “Select foods that taste good to you, because taste is king,” says Dr. Blackburn. You need to stick within healthy parameters, of course, and choose foods that follow the recommendations laid out by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (see www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015). But if you’ve got a hankering for a few French fries or a small brownie once in a while, go ahead. A complete ban of your favorite treats may leave you more likely to abandon your diet altogether and overindulge. Dr. Blackburn has directed the Center for Nutrition Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and advised overweight and obese people for more than four decades. The following are five proven strategies that many of his patients have found helpful toward their goal of lasting weight loss. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Bacon, soda & too few nuts tied to big portion of US deaths

Posted by on Mar 7, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Source:   Lindsey Tanner, AP Medical Writer,Associated Press CHICAGO (AP) — Gorging on bacon, skimping on nuts? These are among food habits that new research links with deaths from heart disease, strokes and diabetes. Overeating or not eating enough of the 10 foods and nutrients contributes to nearly half of U.S. deaths from these causes, the study suggests. “Good” foods that were under-eaten include: nuts and seeds, seafood rich in omega-3 fats including salmon and sardines; fruits and vegetables; and whole grains. “Bad” foods or nutrients that were over-eaten include salt and salty foods; processed meats including bacon, bologna and hot dogs; red meat including steaks and hamburgers; and sugary drinks. The research is based on U.S. government data showing there were about 700,000 deaths in 2012 from heart disease, strokes and diabetes and on an analysis of national health surveys that asked participants about their eating habits. Most didn’t eat the recommended amounts of the foods studied. To continue reading this article please click here...

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Kids’ Exercise Predicts Adult Income

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Finnish study finds links between early physical activity and future earnings, but only for boys. Source:  Runners World / ByAlex Hutchinson TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2016, 9:58 AM The study, by researchers at several universities in Finland and published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, looked at data from 3,000 kids whose physical activity levels were assessed in the 1980s when they were 9, 12, and 15 years old. That data was then linked to Finnish tax records to determine their average income over the 10 years ending in 2010. Among men, the results were clear: Boys who were more active by one standard deviation went on to earn about 30 percent more as adults. That relationship remained robust even after controlling for various factors like family background (including parental levels of physical activity) and weight. To view the entire article please click here...

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